Annual General Meeting 2013

The British Humanist Association held its 2013 Annual General Meeting at the Bishopsgate Institute in London yesterday. Forums focussing on public affairs, education, and ceremonies gave members the opportunity to find out more about the work of the BHA and suggest ideas for developing projects and campaigns further.  The Presidential Address by Jim Al-Khalili was a particular hit with members.

Pavan Dhaliwal, Head of Public Affairs, focussed on her success with marriage reform and the campaign to give legal recognition to humanist marriages. Faith Schools Campaigner Richy Thompson, spoke of his work with the Fair Admissions Campaign, which calls for all state-funded schools in England and Wales to be open equally to all children, without regard to religion or belief. Sara Passmore, Head of Education and Promotion, spoke of the success of the recent events including the Annual Conference and her work developing a training course for volunteers who want to work with teachers in planning lessons on Humanism and humanist beliefs and values. Furthermore, she spoke of the continued successful relationship between BHA and the local humanist groups. Isabel Russo, Head of Ceremonies, at her first AGM, focussed on the recruitment and training of humanist celebrants, the function of the celebrant network, and the promotion of humanist ceremonies to ensure we reach all those who would wish to have a non-religious ceremony.

Commenting on the AGM, BHA Chief Executive Andrew Copson said, ‘I am very proud of the accomplishments of the BHA. Our members are very engaged and keen to share their expertise to help direct our work and our staff members are keen to take forward their views. We are very happy with the progress made this year and we look forward to building on this in the year to come.’

About the BHA

The British Humanist Association is the national charity working on behalf of non-religious people who seek to live ethical and fulfilling lives on the basis of reason and humanity. It promotes a secular state and equal treatment in law and policy of everyone, regardless of religion or belief.